Category: Health (Page 3 of 3)

PLOS ONE: Toward an Understanding of the Environmental and Public Health Impacts of Unconventional Natural Gas Development: A Categorical Assessment of the Peer-Reviewed Scientific Literature, 2009-2015

The body of science evaluating the potential impacts of unconventional natural gas development (UNGD) has grown significantly in recent years, although many data gaps remain. Still, a broad empirical understanding of the impacts is beginning to emerge amidst a swell of research. The present categorical assessment provides an overview of the peer-reviewed scientific literature from 2009–2015 as it relates to the potential impacts of UNGD on public health, water quality, and air quality. We have categorized all available original research during this time period in an attempt to understand the weight and direction of the scientific literature. Our results indicate that at least 685 papers have been published in peer-reviewed scientific journals that are relevant to assessing the impacts of UNGD. 84% of public health studies contain findings that indicate public health hazards, elevated risks, or adverse health outcomes; 69% of water quality studies contain findings that indicate potential, positive association, or actual incidence of water contamination; and 87% of air quality studies contain findings that indicate elevated air pollutant emissions and/or atmospheric concentrations. This paper demonstrates that the weight of the findings in the scientific literature indicates hazards and elevated risks to human health as well as possible adverse health outcomes associated with UNGD. There are limitations to this type of assessment and it is only intended to provide a snapshot of the scientific knowledge based on the available literature. However, this work can be used to identify themes that lie in or across studies, to prioritize future research, and to provide an empirical foundation for policy decisions.

Source: PLOS ONE: Toward an Understanding of the Environmental and Public Health Impacts of Unconventional Natural Gas Development: A Categorical Assessment of the Peer-Reviewed Scientific Literature, 2009-2015

Stanford researchers show fracking’s impact to drinking water sources | Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

Stanford researchers show fracking’s impact to drinking water sourcesA case study of a small Wyoming town reveals that practices common in the fracking industry may have widespread impacts on drinking water resources.

Source: Stanford researchers show fracking’s impact to drinking water sources | Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

Examples of evidence emerging since the publication of the Compendium 3.0 in October 2015

Thanks to PSE Healthy Energy for their work in collating and making available this information. PSE Healthy Energy, Inc. (http://www.psehealthyenergy.org/) is a multidisciplinary research and policy institute that supports the adoption of evidence-based energy policies. PSE is comprised of physicians, scientists, and engineers who work to promote scientific understanding of modern energy development.

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University find that expectant mothers living in the most active area of shale gas development activities were 40% more likely to give birth prematurely. Paper is published in the journal, Epidemiology

http://journals.lww.com/epidem/Citation/2016/03000/Unconventional_Natural_Gas_Development_and_Birth.2.aspx

Yale school of Public Health researchers just released a new study analyzing the chemicals used in frack fluid and fracking waste water. The research team evaluated available data on 1,021 chemical used in fracking. Of the 240 chemicals that have existing toxicity information, evidence suggested reproductive toxicity, developmental toxicity, and/or both for 157 chemicals. Of these, 67 were of particular concern because they already have an existing federal health-based standard or guideline for water quality. Furthermore, toxicity information was lacking for 700+ chemicals, which need to be rigorously analyzed to determine threats to health.

Access to the study can be found here: http://www.nature.com/…/…/vaop/ncurrent/full/jes201581a.html

More to follow.

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